Beating
Herpes

A new approach to creating a world-changing vaccine

Beating
Herpes

A new approach to developing a world-changing vaccine

An end to a global epidemic

There is no approved vaccine for herpes. More than 3.7 billion people under the age of 50 around the world are infected with HSV-1, while over 400 million have HSV-2.1,2 Neonatal infection can be devastating, at 60% fatality without treatment.3 HSV-2 is also known to contribute significantly to the spread of HIV.4

Antiviral drug therapy shows only moderate efficacy and comes with significant side effects.5 Attempts to develop an effective vaccine have repeatedly failed.

X-VAX is here to offer hope for the future by developing a vaccine that can beat herpes.

more about herpes
more about herpes

X-VAX is here to beat herpes—and more

We’re a biotech company committed to developing vaccines against pathogens acquired by mucosal infection such as herpes.

Our research leads us to believe that the new approach we’re taking could succeed in defeating herpes. We’re strongly committed to this fight, and so far our work has been supported with unprecedented data in multiple pre-clinical models.

Our innovative approach came from a moment of brave imagination.

more about us
more about us

New hope, from
a new
approach.

Time and again scientists may have been stimulating production of the wrong type of antibodies.

It was widely assumed that an effective herpes vaccine must stimulate the body to produce neutralizing antibodies. For decades, this assumption may have led researchers down the wrong path—trial after trial failed.

It was widely assumed that an effective herpes vaccine must stimulate the body to produce neutralizing antibodies. For decades, this assumption may have led researchers down the wrong path—trial after trial failed.

We are taking an approach that runs counter to most of the tactics used by other scientists.

Our research team had a moment of inspiration. They asked: What if we eliminate the immunodominant protein on the surface of the herpes virus that other scientists have focused on? They hypothesized that deleting a gene from the virus could stimulate the body to produce different—and more effective—antibodies.

Our research team had a moment of inspiration. They asked: What if we eliminate the immunodominant protein on the surface of the herpes virus that other scientists have focused on? They hypothesized that deleting a gene from the virus could stimulate the body to produce different—and more effective—antibodies.

We call our vaccine candidate ∆gD-2 (delta gD-2), because it is based on an HSV-2 virus genetically deleted for glycoprotein D (gD-2). With it, we have been able to prevent infections caused by herpes type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2) in multiple preclinical models—with very impressive results.

Want to know more about the science involved?